Skip to content

Checklist

If you are unclear whether you fit our guidelines, these checklists might help. We appreciate some applications may fall under both categories. We are only funding groups based in, and working on issues in, Scotland, Ireland, Wales and England.

pale blue line

1. Work run by and for people facing discrimination and injustice (because of their class, ability, gender, race, nationality, religion, sexual orientation, or other factors) that is actively working to challenge these injustices and to create just and healthy communities.

If you are eligible you will agree with most of these statements:

  • We are a group of people facing discrimination and injustice because of our class, ability, gender, race, nationality, religion, sexual orientation, or other factors;
  • We are involved in activities that, for example, expose, challenge and raise awareness of the injustices we face and the causes of them and bring people together to take action, or create new ways for people to live together in society which respects everyone’s right to a happy and healthy life, regardless of who they are. More;
  • We are not an established organisation or registered charity with mainstream sources of funding (e.g. local council, Lottery);
  • We have no or very few paid staff and very little funding. We often fund work out of our own pockets.

pale blue line

2. Work aiming to create systemic change – those who seek to dismantle and replace the structures and processes that create oppression, inequality and environmental destruction.

If you are eligible you will agree with most of these statements:

  • My group does not primarily aim to change individuals’ lives by providing social care, support or aid to help them survive in our unjust society;
  • We aim to change society to create a world where no-one struggles to survive because resources, power and wealth are shared equally and everyone has what they need to live a full and healthy life (including a healthy environment). More;
  • We are involved in activities that, for example, expose, challenge and raise awareness of injustice, brings people together to build a movement or creates alternatives to systems and structures that give power and wealth to the privileged few;
  • We are not an established organisation or registered charity with mainstream sources of funding (e.g. local council, Lottery). We are often ruled out or turned down for funding due to our radical approach or informal structure;
  • We have no or very few paid staff and minimal funding. We often fund work out of our own pockets;
  • We take direction from the people most affected by the issue we’re working on;
  • We organise using a non-hierarchical structure.

 

8 Comments leave one →
  1. April 15, 2013 10:04 am

    Many Thanks Isobel for your comments and Sophie for your reply. I actually agree with both of you and am pleased to see that The Edge Fund is looking at extending it’s work in this area.

    I run a charity which I set up 10 years ago after years of working with people with learning difficulties in both the statutory and voluntary sectors and struggling to enable real choice for the people I worked with. I set up Thumbprint (www.thumb.org.uk). Thumbprint supports individuals in setting up and running their own projects – so on the one hand “primarily aims to change individuals’ lives by providing social care, support or aid to help them survive in our unjust society” – and therefore is not eligible for funding from The Edge Fund, on the other hand I set up Thumbprint in order to change the way people with learning difficulties are supported in their lives and to enable them to be active, equal citizens in the wider community. That is, to create real change. i just felt that the only way to demonstrate that our way of working works better for those involved was by actually carrying out the work practically (otherwise I could be too easily dismissed as an “idealist” or theorist). In that respect I think Thumbprint’s aim to create change is probably in tune with the aims of The Edge Fund.
    It is an interesting debate. I just thought our example perhaps illustrates Isobel’s point in very practical terms.

    Thumbprint, by the way, despite very low funding – and no support at all from the establishment – does show that our way of supporting people with learning difficulties works – and works well – which shows that ideals can be put into practice and create change.

  2. March 19, 2013 4:58 pm

    I think this fund sounds excellent. I would like to apply for funding for my organisation Localise West Midlands to be able to keep pressing our ‘economic localisation for social justice’ agenda – but suspect we may be disqualified as while many of the statements apply to us we are mainly ‘advantaged’ middle class individuals involved and we have some income. But I’m quite encouraged that the fund exists with these stringent criteria and know if we don’t qualify it will be for all the right reasons.

  3. November 21, 2012 5:48 am

    Hi,

    I am writing from Jamaica and I am apart of a radical, newly formed group that deals with Teen girls from marginalized communities by trying to empower them. In your introduction, you stated that the first round was for UK based entities only… can you please explain the process that would apply for me, seeing that I am a Jamaican organization?

    Thanks

  4. November 20, 2012 9:18 pm

    We are a group of people who are helping those struggling to cope with challenge of life transition due to language barrier and cultural difference. We act as bridge between clients and mainstream service providers (activities : information, guidance, advocacy, interpretation, translation, helping fill forms etc…), no support from local authorities and all application for funding rejected because of difficulties in writing funding applications. Can someone help us write bid, press release and develop our website please??

  5. November 14, 2012 9:48 pm

    I think it is really great this fund too! However – we are a small non-governmental organization, independent, non-profit, non-charitable, 4 years of work only once received a minimum (less than 5000 euros) resources from the European Union and never received any local support. Can we apply?

  6. WNM permalink
    November 8, 2012 9:25 pm

    Some police officers are misusing their powers to falsely arrest the ethnic minority. Social services is being too harsh to ethnic minority groups and not giving them a chance or using minimal intervention in family matters as they are supposed to. They are using their descretionary decisions to oppress the ethnic minorities. I have seen black children being removed from families over small matters which could have been resolved without causing so much heartache on families. This oppression in the name of child protection must be put to an end!!!

  7. October 31, 2012 3:02 pm

    Hi Isabel,
    You are absolutely right that people need to have their basic needs met before they can be in a position to take action against the injustices they face. I also totally understand your point about us potentially only attracting middle-class activists, which would be a real failure on our part. We want to find ways to help those most affected by inequality and injustice to take action; creating the space needed to do that may well involve covering living costs etc of those who want to take action but cannot because of their personal circumstances. Unfortunately, we’re not in a position to fund care and support for many people as we’re young and small, but in the longer-term we’d love to help those groups access funding elsewhere. Most care and support work would qualify as ‘charitable’ and therefore has many more avenues to try for funding than more radical work. Self-organised groups would also qualify for this funding, although in some cases perhaps would not know how to access it.

    We’re committed to making it work and appreciate it’s going to take time and persistence and different approaches. We’d really welcome your advice and involvement!

    This article explains in more detail where we’re coming from:
    http://www.campaigncentral.org.uk/opinion/funding-social-change-bottom

    Sophie

  8. Isabel permalink
    October 31, 2012 2:26 pm

    I think it is really great this fund has been set up. However – I am unclear what “my group does not primarily aim to change individuals’ lives by providing social care, support or aid to help them survive in our unjust society” means. In my experience of working with migrants and people surviving on benefits care and support is part of addressing root causes. Individuals concretely gaining from their activism is what builds actual self organised groups where the people most effected participate and direct political activity. And care and support (not simply on “radical” actions is a big part of this). I don’t think providing care and support and addressing root causes are contradictory. You might also consider that WHO provides this care and support might have some bearing on this. For instance, a group of migrant women who all have housing problems and who empowered to offer each other support and advice might be a radical group whereas a client- professional housing charity might not be (although it would still do useful work).

    I wonder if by sticking to this criteria (if I have understood it correctly) you will only gain applications from grassroots groups or organisations directed by or made up of middle class activists. Again – brilliant this fund is here – but some clarification on the point I raised above would be useful.

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: